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Four Generations of Estevez on "The Way"

A heartfelt project, scrappy and engaging

By Se Fija!
Published on LatinoLA: October 11, 2011


Four Generations of Estevez on "The Way"


There are movies made all the time that participants in front and behind the camera call "a labor of love." It's never been as true as it is for "The Way," a gentle and moving new independent comedy written and directed by Emilio Estevez.

Now at the truly advanced age of 49, Emilio must be tired as hell of still being referred to as "Martin Sheen's other son" or "Charlie Sheen's brother," or being remembered best as a straight arrow in a John Hughes movie thirty years ago. (Okay, we admit it: we loved "Breakfast Club." Thirty years ago.) But now he's a grown man, with a grown son all his own, and Estevez has turned the potentially burdensome reputation of his family into something rather special: "The Way."

Emilio not only wrote and directed "The Way;" he costars in it, too‘«™alongside his father Martin Sheen, who plays‘«Űoddly enough‘«Űhis father. The story of a prosperous American businessman, stuck on a unintentional pilgrimage along the Camino de Santiago, has been called "A heartfelt project, scrappy and engaging," "a thoughtful, moving personal adventure," and a "uniquely memorable experience." And equally important, it involves‘«Űin one way or another‘«Űfour different generations of the Estevez family.

In many recent interviews, Emilio tells how he decided to do this story, in part, to be closer to his own son, Ramon‘«Űwho became a production assistant and later, an executive producer on the film. He cast his own father, who just happened to be an award-winning actor, to play the lead‘«™and the sojourn of the actor and the real-life location of the film itself ends almost on the doorstep of the tiny Spanish village where Martin's father, Emilio's grandfather was born. And now, long after the film is completed. Emilio and his Dad are on a cross-country bus tour, in a bus of their own design, visiting cities and town where the movie should be playing, running it a couple of times in each venue in their bus' own studio, and generally spreading the family-word in a way nobody else could.

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